What causes hair loss?

By far the most common form of hair loss and hair thinning is determined by our genes and hormones: Also known as androgen-dependent, androgenic, or genetic hair loss. It is the largest single type of recognisable alopecia to affect both men and women. It is estimated that around 30% of Caucasian females are affected before menopause. Other commonly used names for genetic hair loss include common baldness, diffuse hair loss, male or female pattern baldness.

What causes baldness

The rate of hair shedding in androgenic alopecia is speeded up by three forces: advancing age, an inherited tendency to bald early, and an over-abundance of the male hormone dihydrotestosterone (DHT) within the hair follicle. DHT is a highly active form of testosterone, which influences many aspects of manly behavior, from sex drive to aggression.

But the hormonal link in balding is complex. Eunuchs, who produce no testosterone, never go bald — even if carrying a baldness gene. However, if castrated men with a family history of baldness are given testosterone, they lose hair in the classic horseshoe-shaped pattern.

Studies show that while balding men don’t have higher than average circulating testosterone levels, they do possess above-average amounts of a powerful testosterone derivative, dihydrotestosterone in the scalp follicles. In male balding, genetically primed follicles convert circulating testosterone to dihydrotestosterone, which successively diminishes or miniaturizes follicle size, producing ever weaker hairs. With a steadily shorter anagen growing cycle, more hairs are shed, the hairs become thinner and thinner until they are too fine to survive daily wear and tear.

Balding hair gradually changes from long, thick, coarse, pigmented hair into fine, depigmented fleece sprouts.
Other physiological factors might cause hair loss. Recently, a group of Japanese researcher reported a correlation between excessive sebum in the scalp and hair loss. Excessive sebum often accompanying thinning hair is attributed to an enlargement of the sebaceous gland. They believed excessive sebum causes a high level of 5-alpha-reductase and pore clogging, thus malnutrition of the hair root.

FACTORS IN HAIR LOSS

 

1- Genes

The rate of hair shedding in androgenic alopecia is speeded up by three forces: advancing age, an inherited tendency to bald early, and an over-abundance of the male hormone dihydrotestosterone (DHT) within the hair follicle. DHT is a highly active form of testosterone, which influences many aspects of manly behavior, from sex drive to aggression.

The conversion from testosterone to DHT is driven by an enzyme called 5-alpha reductase, which is produced in the prostate, various adrenal glands, and the scalp. Over time, the action of DHT causes the hair follicle to degrade and shortens the anagen phase. Thought the follicle is technically still alive and connected to a good blood supply–it can successfully nurture a transplanted follicle which is immune to the effects of DHT–it will grow smaller and smaller (figure 3). Some follicles will gradually die, but most will simply shrink to the size they were when you were born which produce weaker hairs. With a steadily shorter anagen growing cycle, more hairs are shed, the hairs become thinner and thinner until they are too fine to survive daily wear and tear. Balding hair gradually changes from long, thick, coarse, pigmented hair into fine, unpigmented fleece sprouts.

However, the sebaceous gland attached to it remains the same size. As the hair shafts become smaller, the gland continues to pump out about the same amount of oil. So as your hair thins, you will notice that your hair becomes flatter and oilier.

But the hormonal link in balding is complex. Eunuchs, who produce no testosterone, never go bald — even if carrying a baldness gene. However, if castrated men with a family history of baldness are given testosterone, they lose hair in the classic horseshoe-shaped pattern.

Studies show that while balding men don’t have higher than average circulating testosterone levels, they do possess above-average amounts of a powerful testosterone derivative, dihydrotestosterone in the scalp follicles. In male balding, genetically primed follicles convert circulating testosterone to dihydrotestosterone, which successively diminishes or miniaturizes follicle size, producing ever weaker hairs. With a steadily shorter anagen growing cycle, more hairs are shed, the hairs become thinner and thinner until they are too fine to survive daily wear and tear. Balding hair gradually changes from long, thick, coarse, pigmented hair into fine, depigmented fleece sprouts.

Other physiological factors might cause hair loss. Recently, a group of Japanese researcher reported a correlation between excessive sebum in the scalp and hair loss. Excessive sebum often accompanying thinning hair is attributed to an enlargement of the sebaceous gland. They believed excessive sebum causes a high level of 5-alpha reductase and pore clogging, thus malnutrition of the hair root.

Although this condition could be hereditary, they believe diet is a more prominent cause. The researchers note that Japanese hair was thick and healthy, with a small gland and little scalp oil, until the occidental habit of consuming animal fat crept into their diet after World War II. This change has led to a significant height increase in the Japanese population, but it has also resulted in more Japanese men losing hair. To some extent, their observation makes sense since problems with greasy hair have often been noted as much as six months to a year prior to when thinning hair becomes noticeable, but this might be just one of the symptoms, not the underlying cause, more research is needed. Most doctors agree that if you have an oily scalp with thinning hair, frequent shampooing is advised. shampooing can reduce surface sebum, which contains high levels of testosterone and DHT that may reenter the skin and affect the hair follicle.

With advances in genetic engineering and genetic medicine, it will not take long for scientists to identify the specific gene (or genes) exclusively responsible for male pattern baldness. This will help us not only treat androgenetic hair loss, but also give us the ability to predict future hair loss in a newborn baby.

2- Hormonal hair loss

The hormones involved in the mechanism of androgenetic hair loss are male hormones, which are called androgens. The answer to the question “How androgens cause baldness?” is not straightforward. Androgens have profound influences on several biological mechanisms. They exert their actions by interacting with specific receptors found on cell membranes or inside cells, as all other hormones do. Several types of androgens can affect a single hair follicle and different types of hair follicles in different regions of the skin respond to the same androgen in different ways. For example, hairs located on the armpit respond to androgens by growing, whereas hairs in the scalp fall out in response to them.

3- STRESS

There are several types of hair loss, some are more severe than others and some require more medical attention than others. Telogen Effluvium is one of the most common types but it is no less unwelcome to those who suffer from it. The condition is stress related and is not permanent. Rather than simply falling out, the hair first stops growing. It can then lie dormant for as long as 3 months before actually falling out. Unlike more severe types of hair loss the hair will start to grow back during the following 6 to 9 months.

Another stress-related type of hair loss is Alopecia Areata. This occurs when white blood cells attack hair follicles. This then leads to rapid hair loss. The loss often occurs in patches but within the space of a few weeks the entire scalp can be affected. In extreme cases body hair can also fall out. The hair often grows back in time, but not always; in some cases treatment is required.

The most common type of stress-induced hair loss is telogen effluvium. In this type of hair loss, the hair stops growing and lies dormant, only to fall out 2 or 3 months later. Then it grows back within 6 to 9 months.
If you are experiencing hair thinning or baldness and you think there may be a problem then it is advisable to consult a doctor. It may be the body’s natural aging process but if you are still young; in your teens or early twenties, or if the loss seems irregular or uneven then there could be a problem.

In many cases of hair loss the root of the problem is stress. Stress has always been with us, it’s not a new phenomenon, but due to increased awareness through medical advances and the way that the condition is reported in the media, we now have a better understanding of the debilitating effect it can have on people. The demands of modern life certainly don’t help and if you are concerned that stress may be the cause of your hair loss it is worth taking a good look at your lifestyle to see if there is anything you can do to manage your stress levels. (Scroll down for additional resources) Lifestyle plays a large part in our wellbeing and our hair is not impervious to this.

4- AGEING

It should be kept in mind that even the presence of both, necessary genes and hormones, is not sufficient to cause androgenetic hair loss. The hair loss process also needs time, during which susceptible hair follicles will be exposed to male hormones. The time required for this kind of hair loss to take place varies from one individual to another. The development of male pattern baldness is dependent on a person’s genetic expression and the level of androgens in his or her blood.

Moreover, even when there is no predisposition to androgenetic hair loss, as people get older, some hairs randomly begin to shrink both in length and diameter. This process is called miniaturization. As a result, miniaturized hairs will be shed and actual follicular units decrease in number.

Male hair loss

Two types of androgens are involved in the mechanism of male pattern hair loss. These are testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Dihydrotestosterone is a derivative of testosterone. The enzyme called 5-alpha reductase converts the relatively inactive testosterone to a more potent form, dihydrotestosterone. Thus, the key enzyme involved in androgenetic hair loss is 5-alpha reductase, which is also found in and around the hair follicle, especially in the dermal papilla. Once formed, this potent male hormone, DHT gains the ability to bind any androgen receptor on the hair follicles. Plain testosterone can also act on the follicles, but its effect of causing hair loss is weaker.
By the interaction of these two hormones and their receptors on the follicle, hairs covering the scalp undergo some changes ending with hair loss. Over time, the growth cycles of the terminal hair follicles on the scalp get progressively shorter, with reduced anagen (growing) phase. Catagen (intermediate) and telogen (shedding or resting) phases of hairs remain the same, thus, yielding a net result of increased number of resting hair follicles. So, the usual proportion of telogen follicles (10%) increases up to 20% of total. That is, more hairs enter the resting stage and the number of hairs that shed increases.The affected follicles decrease both in length and diameter, growing thinner, shorter and more brittle hairs with weaker shafts.

Male pattern baldness

 

Androgenetic Alopecia

How do androgens cause baldness?

The male hormones involved in the mechanism of androgenetic hair loss are called androgens. The answer to the question “How do androgens cause baldness?” will need explaining in more than the space of a few lines.
There are a number of reasons behind the cause:

● Androgens act by interacting with specific receptors found on cell membranes or inside cells, as all other hormones do.
● Several forms of the androgen hormone can affect the hair follicles and different areas of the skin respond to the same androgen in various ways.
● For example, hairs located on the armpit respond to androgens by growing, whereas hairs in the scalp fall out in response to them.
Testosterone and Dihydrotestosterone
The two types of androgens involved in male pattern hair loss are testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT hormone).
● The enzyme- 5-alpha reductase turns inactive testosterone into a more power form which is called dihydrotestosterone.
● 5-alpha reductase is the key enzyme involved in androgenetic hair loss.
● Once dihydrotestosterone is formed it has the ability to overpower any androgen molecule present on a hair follicle, leading to hair loss.
● Plain testosterone can also act on the follicles, but its effect of causing hair loss is weaker.
THE IMPACT OF TESTOSTERONE AND DIHYDROTESTOTERONE
The combination of testosterone and dihydrotestoterone, result in enduring changes to hairs covering the scalp and ends with hair loss.
● The power of these two hormones grouped together break down the hair growth cycle by making the anagen (growth) phase progressively shorter.
● The catagen (intermediate) and telogen (shedding or resting) phases remain the same resulting in an increased number of resting hair follicles within the hair growth process.
● The more hairs that enter the resting phase increase the number of shedding hairs.
● The shedding process starts with a decrease in length and fullness. Hairs grow thinner and shorter leading to brittle hairs that are prone to fall out.
Why do men develop Male Pattern Baldness?
You may wonder why some males develop male pattern baldness and others do not. All men and women have the hormones that cause hair loss within their bodies so you would think that everyone would develop baldness.
There isn’t a straight answer as to why some of us develop baldness over others, however there are speculations listed below:
● The number of androgen receptors in a single hair follicle is higher in patients that have androgenetic hair loss compared with those that do not.
● Balding persons’ hair follicles have a higher sensitivity to androgens than normal, which results in a more pronounced effect of hair loss.
● The enzyme 5-alpha reductase is higher in the balding area, which converts more testosterone to dihydrotestosterone. The higher the proportion of the DHT hormone to testosterone, the faster the hair loss process.

Non-pattern Hair Loss

 

What Causes Non-Pattern Hair Loss in Women?

In men more rarely than in women, hair loss may be due to conditions other than androgenetic alopecia. Some of the most common of these causes are:

Compulsive hair pulling (Trichotillomania)

Hair loss due to trichotillomania is typically patchy, as compulsive hair pullers tend to concentrate the pulling in selected areas. Hair loss due to this cause cannot be treated effectively until the psychological or emotional reasons for trichotillomania are effectively addressed.

Alopecia areata

a possible autoimmune disorder that causes patchy hair loss that can range from diffuse thinning to extensive areas of baldness with “islands” of retained hair. A medical examination is necessary to establish a diagnosis.

Triangular alopecia

Loss of hair in the temporal areas that sometimes begins in childhood. Hair loss may be complete, or a few fine, thin-diameter hairs may remain. The cause of triangular alopecia is not known, but the condition can be treated medically or surgically.

Scarring alopecia

Hair loss due to scarring of the scalp area. Scarring alopecia typically involves the top of the scalp and occurs predominantly in women. The condition frequently occurs in African-American women and is believed to be associated with persistent tight braiding or “corn-rowing” of scalp hair.

Loose-anagen syndrome

A condition occurring primarily in fair-haired persons in which scalp hair sits loosely in hair follicles and is easily extracted by combing or pulling. The condition may appear in childhood, and may improve as the person ages.

Diet

Diet and hair loss are closely linked and different foods can cause hair loss, and some can help us maintain healthy hair. Different foods contain different vitamins which help keep our hair health, others have the opposite effect. Ensure your diet is rich in B vitamins can help hair growth. However, a diet that has too much vitamin A, can actually lead to hair loss.

Telogen Effluvium

 

What Is Telogen Effluvium?

Telogen effluvium, is hair loss due to an increased number of hair follicles entering the resting stage. The most common causes of Telogen Effluvium are :

Thyroid abnormalities, Medications:

High doses of Vitamin A –Blood pressure medications — Gout medications.

Diet and Hair Loss

Hair loss may also occur due to dieting. Franchised diet programs which are designed or administered under the direction of a physician with prescribed meals, dietary supplements and vitamin ingestion have become popular. Sometimes vitamins are a necessary part of the program to prevent hair loss associated with dieting. However, the vitamins cannot prevent hair loss associated with rapid, significant weight loss. Furthermore, many of these supplements are high in vitamin A which can magnify the hair loss.

Physical Stress & Emotional Stress

(surgery, illness, anemia, rapid weight change, mental illness, death of a family member)
Surgeries, severe illnesses and emotional stress can cause hair loss. The body simply shuts down production of hair during periods of stress since it is not necessary for survival and instead devotes its energies toward repairing vital body structures. In many cases there is a three month delay between the actual event and the onset of hair loss. Furthermore, there may be another three month delay prior to the return of noticeable hair re-growth. This then means that the total hair loss and re-growth cycle can last 6 months or possibly longer when induced by physical or emotional stress. There are some health conditions which may go undetected that can contribute to hair loss. These include anemia or low blood count and thyroid abnormalities. Both of these conditions can be detected by a simple, inexpensive blood test.

When the above causes of telogen effluvium are reversed or altered you should see the return of normal hair growth.

Female hair loss

At ESTHCARE Hair Clinic we understand how detrimental hair loss can be to a woman’s confidence. However before beginning the journey of regaining this self-confidence, one of the most important things you need to determine is what type of hair loss you are experiencing.

There are generally three types of women hair loss. These are summed up via the three following categories – androgenetic alopecia, Telogen effluvium, and non-pattern hair loss. Androgenetic alopecia is the most common cause of hair loss in women, and the pattern of hair loss in this case, is less predictable in women than it is men. Telogen effluvium can arise from many causes, including medication use, dietary tendencies, and stress. Then there are all of the other rarer types of hair loss, which fall into the ‘non-pattern hair loss category’.

Causes of Hair Loss in Women

In some cases, there may be an underlying cause of hair loss that is untreated. In women, there are a few health problems that can be the root cause of hair loss.

Pregnancy

Being pregnant is one of the biggest stresses that a woman can put her body through. During this time, hormone levels are completely different to normal, causing many changes in the body – and your hair is not immune from these effects.

During pregnancy, there is an increased level of the hormone Oestrogen. Oestrogen causes your hair to remain in the growing stage of the hair growth cycle, as well as stimulating hair to grow if it’s not already. While you are pregnant, you should expect to have a full, luscious head of hair.

Once you have given birth, however, things are different. As your hormones return to their normal levels, this can cause a massive shock to the body, and your hair.
This means that all the oestrogen that kept your hair from falling out is now gone, so the hair starts to shed. This can be distressing, because as much as 60% of the hair can enter the resting stage at once, causing a lot of hair to suddenly fall out.
However, the hair will start to grow again. Hair loss caused by pregnancy is essentially a specialised form of Telogen Effluvium.

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome – or PCOS – is thought to affect as many as one in five women in the UK, according to the NHS.
As PCOS is a hormonal disorder – specifically affecting your endocrine levels – it causes hormonal imbalances. Many women who suffer with PCOS have increased levels of androgens; testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT). It is this increased amount of DHT that causes hair loss in women who have PCOS.
When found in high amounts, androgens – specifically DHT – latch onto hair follicles and start to affect the hair, eventually causing hair loss. DHT then clogs the hair follicle, causing it to be unable to create new hair. This is essentially another form of androgenetic alopecia.

Menopause

Menopause has a myriad of effects on your body and hair, all caused by the decreasing levels of oestrogen. Along with the hot flushes, mood changes and sudden increase in facial hair – you can expect your hair to thin, your hairline to recede and an increased amount of hair loss.
The cause of this is the reduced oestrogen levels. As oestrogen keeps your hair in the growing phase, the reduced levels cause the hair’s growth cycle to shorten and hair sheds before it reaches the length it used to be able to reach.

Anaemia

Anaemia is a blood disorder caused by a lack of iron. Iron is an incredibly important nutrient for your hair.
Anaemia is typically caused by a lack of iron-rich food in your diet, or if your cells are not absorbing the iron properly.

If you noticed that you have thinning hair, it can be worth checking with your GP first to see if you are anaemic to some degree. Iron levels can be corrected with a form of iron supplement and changes in diet.

Iron is important for hair as it contains ferritin, a stored iron that helps to produce hair cell proteins. The correct ferritin levels also maximize your hair’s anagen (growing) phase, as well as encouraging hair to grow to the correct length.

Other causes of hair loss

In order to discover more about the type of hair loss you may be experiencing and the solutions at your disposal, you should book a consultation and visit us at the clinic for a detailed assessment.

Deciding to get a hair transplant is a huge decision with many different aspects to consider from picking the right transplant clinic to deciding when the best time to get a transplant is. A variety of different things come into play when decided when is the right time for you to get a transplant and today we’re going to try and make that a little easier for you.

At ESTHCARE Hair Clinic we’re experts in the innovative FUE hair transplant procedure. Every procedure and client is different but when the best time to get a transplant is similar for most. From the best age to get a transplant to the best time of the year to get a transplant, we’ve got all the information you need.

If you would like any more information about hair loss please feel free to contact us and book a free no obligation consultation.

 

Female pattern baldness

Androgenetic Alopecia

The most common cause of hair loss in women is the same as in men, Androgenetic Alopecia. This inherited sensitivity to the effects of male hormones (androgens) on the scalp and hair follicles causes thinning of the hair in the same way that it does with men but women rarely develop a receding hairline. Women do not develop the same Pattern Baldness or complete baldness that men do.

Androgenetic Alopecia affects one-third of susceptible women. It is most commonly seen in women after the menopause but can occur in younger women and has even been known to begin in puberty. Research has found that 13 per cent of women suffer from this type of hair loss before the menopause and the figure rises after the menopause. At the age of 65 some 75 per cent of women suffer from some sort of hair loss.

The signs of Androgenetic Alopecia in women differ from those in men in that there will be no ‘horseshoe’ shape to the hair that is left. In women the hair loss is from the whole scalp and is uniform. This thinning rarely results in female baldness but the hair thinning can be exaggerated at the back or the front.

Female hair loss is less predictable and more varied than male hair loss but follows a similar development. It is, to a large degree, genetic. Normal hair loss, which is experienced by everyone, is approximately 100-125 hairs per day. These are replaced with no noticeable difference. However, hair loss occurs when these hairs are not replaced or the daily loss increases.

Female hair loss can be broken down into three types: Type1: Diffuse thinning of hair over the whole scalp, often with more noticeable thinning towards the back of the scalp. Type2: Diffuse thinning of hair over the whole scalp, with more noticeable thinning toward the front of the scalp but no change in the frontal hairline. Type3: Diffuse thinning over the whole scalp, with more noticeable thinning toward the front of the scalp. Sometimes the frontal hairline is involved and can begin to recede.

If you are a woman experiencing some degree of hair loss or hair thinning your first step should be to have the condition correctly diagnosed by a specialist. After a diagnosis is correctly made an appropriate approach to treating the condition can be recommended. This might involve medical or surgical treatment.

There are many other reasons for hair loss as well as Androgenetic Alopecia. Hair loss can be brought on by surgery, illness, medication or stress. In these situations, the body simply shuts down production of non-essential products, including hair, so that it can concentrate its resources where they are most needed. Medical conditions such as anaemia, low blood count, hormonal changes, pregnancy and thyroid problems can also affect hair growth and lead to hair loss. Usually in these cases the hair loss is temporary and will grow back.

Ludwig Classification of Female Pattern Baldness

If you are a woman with thinning or lost scalp hair, your first necessary step is to have the condition correctly diagnosed by a physician hair restoration specialist. After a diagnosis is made, the physician will recommend an approach to effective medical or surgical treatment.

Causes of hair loss: Surgeries, severe illness, and emotional stress can cause hair loss. The body simply shuts down production of hair during periods of stress in order to devote its energies toward repairing vital body structures. In many cases there is a delay between the actual event and the onset of hair loss. Furthermore, there can be another long delay prior to the return of noticeable hair re-growth. This means that the total hair loss and re-growth cycle can last 6 months or possibly longer when induced by physical or emotional stress. There are some health conditions which may go undetected that can contribute to hair loss — these include anemia or low blood count and thyroid abnormalities. Both of these conditions can be detected by a simple, inexpensive blood test.

Women may experience some noticeable hair loss in the wake of a major hormonal change. In most cases though, the condition does not become terribly advanced. Post pregnancy hormone conditions can be a cause of this type of hair loss as can discontinuation of birth control pills, menopause and menstrual cycles. In most cases though, the condition is temporary. Many women discover that their hair will grow back to its former luster within a year.

Non-pattern Hair Loss

 

What Causes Non-Pattern Hair Loss in Women?

In women more often than in men, hair loss may be due to conditions other than androgenetic alopecia. Some of the most common of these causes are:
Compulsive hair pulling (Trichotillomania)
Hair loss due to trichotillomania is typically patchy, as compulsive hair pullers tend to concentrate the pulling in selected areas. Hair loss due to this cause cannot be treated effectively until the psychological or emotional reasons for trichotillomania are effectively addressed.

Alopecia areata

Alopecia areata is a possible autoimmune disorder that causes patchy hair loss that can range from diffuse thinning to extensive areas of baldness with “islands” of retained hair. Medical examination is necessary to establish a diagnosis.

Triangular alopecia

Loss of hair in the temporal areas that sometimes begins in childhood. Hair loss may be complete, or a few fine, thin-diameter hairs may remain. The cause of triangular alopecia is not known, but the condition can be treated medically or surgically.

Scarring alopecia

Hair loss due to scarring of the scalp area. Scarring alopecia typically involves the top of the scalp and occurs predominantly in women. The condition frequently occurs in African-American women and is believed to be associated with persistent tight braiding or “corn-rowing” of scalp hair. A form of scarring alopecia also may occur in post-menopausal women, associated with inflammation of hair follicles and subsequent scarring.

Loose-anagen syndrome

A condition occurring primarily in fair-haired persons in which scalp hair sits loosely in hair follicles and is easily extracted by combing or pulling. The condition may appear in childhood, and may improve as the person ages.

Telogen Effluvium

 

What Is Female Telogen Effluvium?

Telogen effluvium is hair loss due to an increased number of hair follicles entering the resting stage. The most common causes of Telogen Effluvium are :
Thyroid abnormalities, Medications:
High doses of Vitamin A –Blood pressure medications — Gout medications.

Diet Considerations

Hair loss may also occur due to dieting. Franchised diet programs which are designed or administered under the direction of a physician with prescribed meals, dietary supplements and vitamin ingestion have become popular. Sometimes vitamins are a necessary part of the program to prevent hair loss associated with dieting. However, the vitamins cannot prevent hair loss associated with rapid, significant weight loss. Furthermore, many of these supplements are high in vitamin A which can magnify the hair loss.

Physical Stress & Emotional Stress

(surgery, illness, anemia, rapid weight change, mental illness, death of a family member)
Surgeries, severe illnesses and emotional stress can cause hair loss. The body simply shuts down production of hair during periods of stress since it is not necessary for survival and instead devotes its energies toward repairing vital body structures. In many cases there is a three month delay between the actual event and the onset of hair loss. Furthermore, there may be another three month delay prior to the return of noticeable hair re-growth. This then means that the total hair loss and re-growth cycle can last 6 months or possibly longer when induced by physical or emotional stress. There are some health conditions which may go undetected that can contribute to hair loss. These include anemia or low blood count and thyroid abnormalities. Both of these conditions can be detected by a simple, inexpensive blood test.

Hormonal Causes

(pregnancy, birth control pills, menopause)
Hormonal changes are a common cause of female hair loss. Many women do not realize that hair loss can occur after pregnancy or following discontinuation of birth control pills. It is important to remember that the hair loss may be delayed by three months following the hormonal change and another three months will be required for new growth to be fully achieved.

When the above causes of telogen effluvium are reversed or altered you should see the return of normal hair growth.

Privacy Policy | © All Rights Resurved